Recapping the Santa Monica Sales 2.0 Conference

Attendees continue to post great takeaways & feedback from the Sales Strategies in a Social & Mobile World Conference. Here are some of the reports we’ve seen so far (we’ll continue to update this list as new posts appear).

TIP: Our next event will be March 5, 2012, in Philadelphia. (We’ll be happy to send you an email when the agenda goes live in early December.)

UPDATE 11/17/11/ 3:00 PM PT: Bonnie Navarre blogged her responses to two powerful presentations: Jon Ferrara (“Connecting with Today’s Prospect: Strategies for Success with Social CRM, Mobile Tools & Social Media”) and Jeffrey Hayzlett (“Sales & Marketing Strategies for Growth-Oriented Organizations”) — she also listed some takeaways, including:

  • Change is not an event, it is an activity
  • Be a curator of information, trends, data, content rather than inventing everything from scratch.
  • Social media users have overtaken email users
  • Do you have an elevator pitch down? 110 seconds is about the time that we would have in an elevator in NY to tell our story/sell our idea/share a compelling mission.

UPDATE 11/17/11 2:13 PM PT: Caitlin Roberson writing on the Wordisseur blog observed that alignment between sales & marketing is old news — today, sales and marketing should be synonymous:

“Companies need to establish formal definitions of a qualified sales lead across their organization. Conversations and collaboration must lead to measurable ROI metrics if they have any hope of fueling future success.”

1)  Jim Keenan posted some observations about what conference host Gerhard Gschwandtner called “adoption apathy” in the face of what sales leaders cite as their biggest challenges. According to a 2011 Sales Leadership Priorities Survey from Frost & Sullivan, these challenges include the following:

  • 73% see changes in customer buying behavior as a challenge
  • 77% are feeling commoditization pressures
  • 50% see identifying and qualifying high-potential prospects
  • 22% find it difficult to respond to clients changing business environment
  • 40% want to accelerate the close
  • 22% looking to improve sales reps productivity
  • 22% need to align the sales process with the customers’ purchasing

2) Aaron Ross (author of Predictable Revenue) did this quick video interview with speaker Mark Roberge, VP of Sales at HubSpot, who shared insights on how to use data and analytics to create predictable revenue growth and make better sales management decisions:

3) The folks over at Totango assembled some fantastic lessons learned from speakers and panelists — the post is well worth reading in full detail, but here’s a preview of their thoughts:

  • Attract many, then focus on filtering.
  • Give all salespeople a social media address.
  • Deliver value first, sell later.
  • Use online demos to drive sales.
  • Consider a territory model based on social proximity.
  • Move towards a lower touch model.

Were you at the event? What were your big ah-ha moments, and which speakers brought the best ideas to the table?

About Lisa

Editorial Director at SellingPower.com.
This entry was posted in Conference Speakers, Social Media and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Recapping the Santa Monica Sales 2.0 Conference

  1. Pingback: Sales Software: Lessons Learned from the Sales 2.0 Conference | Go Big Always

  2. Kurt Shaver says:

    The biggest take-away for me was that social media has blurred the line between Marketing and Sales. It used to be that Marketing blasted the message to create demand and salespeople converted leads to orders. Now that buyers pay more attention to their social networks, the individual salesperson has become a more important communication avenue to customers. Sales 2.0 reps need to grow their network and supply the meaningful information exchange that pulls the prospects to them.

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